Rolling on

Rolling on

Trails 2000 has ridden off into the sunset – well, at least in name. The 30-year-old local trails advocacy nonprofit recently changed its name to Durango Trails to better reflect its mission into the future.

“It’s a brand refresh, but it’s still the same mission,” spokesperson Mary Monroe-Brown said. “While our look and name have changed, our work has not. We are still committed to planning, building and maintaining the trails surrounding Durango, as well as educating trail users and creating connections.”

As the story goes, back in the mid-’80s, four local mountain bikers, seeing rampant development in, on and around their beloved public lands, sought to grow and protect the area’s trails. The now seemingly short-sighted goal was to have 200 miles of trails by the year 2000. Little did they know how far that vision would go.

By 2020, Trails 2000 had far exceeded the dream of 200 miles of trails and counted more than 3,500 members. As for the name, it needed an upgrade to reflect the times and its work that weren’t so, well, 2000.

“We are the infrastructure group, and we wanted our name to better reflect forward-thinking of outdoor recreation as a cornerstone of our community,” said Monroe-Brown. “The trails and outdoor recreation are only going to grow.”

According to Monroe-Brown, the name change officially took place on Earth Day, April 20. The unveiling was meant to coincide with the organization’s 30-year anniversary party at Ska on the same day, but nothing like a little global pandemic to put those plans on hold. 

And while dirt-lovers await updated details on the soiree, they can check out the new Durango Trails website (www.durangotrails.org, although going to trails2000.org will redirect you there.) The new site is chock full of useful trail info, including trail conditions, tips on the always-important etiquette, and a nifty “trail finder,” where folks can dial in the type of trail experience they’re looking for.

“You can search for anything from a safe trail during COVID to a PB&J hike with the kids,” Monroe-Brown said.

And while we’re on the subject of trails, Monroe-Brown said she has no idea who or what was behind the mysterious mountain lion print-outs plastered all over Horse Gulch. “I don’t know who put them up or what is going on with that,” she said. “But people have been calling and asking.” 

Meanwhile, Durango Trails will be working hard during the upcoming trails season on training crew leaders to send out with small armies of volunteers. If you happen to see them buffing out your favorite stretch of singletrack, don’t forget to slow down and say “thanks.” Or better yet, pull off and give them a hand. 

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