Day in the Life

Gone but not forgotten
Gone but not forgotten

Strolling the sidewalks of downtown Main Avenue, longtime locals can’t help but reminisce about a few businesses that have etched their names in Durango’s storefront history. 

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Scratching the surface
Scratching the surface

Hidden below southeastern New Mexico's Chihuahuan Desert is one of the world's most extensive subterranean landscapes, Lechuguilla Cave.

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Chasing waterfalls
Chasing waterfalls
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Set in Stone
Set in Stone

Located along the meandering Animas River, New Mexico’s Aztec Ruins National Monument offers visitors a glimpse of Indigenous human history 1,000 years past.

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Lighter than Air
Lighter than Air

Known as the first human-transporting flight technology, hot air ballooning affords the surreal experience of floating upon gentle currents of prevailing wind in a wicker basket.

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Sharp contrast
Sharp contrast

Did you know that cacti are native only to the Americas? Growing from Patagonia to British Columbia, there are 1,750 known species.

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Etched in Stone
Etched in Stone

It’s a fine line between vandalism and history, especially here in the Four Corners.

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Cold Smoke
Cold Smoke

It’s been quite some time since the San Juans have experienced the true blessings of Old Man Winter prior to the solstice.

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Birds of a feather
Birds of a feather

Zink’s Pond, located along the Animas River south of Durango, has long been a choice location for birders.

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Feeling the pull
Feeling the pull

Sedona, Ariz., is known as a mountain biking, yoga, energy-vortex and psychic mecca all rolled into one.

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Ties that bind
Ties that bind

From 1902 until the mid-1960s, the railroad line between Farmington and Durango was busy hauling everything from agricultural supplies to oil drilling equipment up and down the Animas River corridor.

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Ice Castles
Ice Castles

Evidence of last season’s historic avalanche cycles still abound throughout the San Juans. As we transition into winter, established ice dams and rugged debris piles remain in place.

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Sedimental journey
Sedimental journey

Behold one of the world’s most common minerals: gypsum!

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On the rocks
On the rocks

Strolling up the Colorado Trail from the Junction Creek Trailhead on a sunny, clear afternoon one might take notice of the subtle play of water, light and stone in the shallow pools and riffles found trailside.

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Etched in Stone
Etched in Stone

In the case of gravestones, symbols are often used to represent or commemorate a soul no longer among the living.

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Brown Town
Brown Town

It’s a unique time in the mountains before the snow comes.

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Total Slackers
Total Slackers

What started out as a method for rock climbers to hone their balance and concentration (and remain entertained on rest days), slacklining has evolved into a full-blown sport, if not art.

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Wandering on the Juan
Wandering on the Juan

Originating high in the alpine landscape of Colorado’s southern San Juan Mountains, the San Juan River carves its way 383 miles from mountain to desert, meandering into three states on its way to Lake Powell.

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True Colors
True Colors

Much to the delight of those who love the colors of autumn, this season is one for the books.

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Leave Only Footprints
Leave Only Footprints

Perhaps one of the more curious details left behind by the original inhabitants that once roamed the western Colorado and southern Utah landscape are the ancient hand and toe trails known as moki steps.

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