Murder Ink: Joining the Burke brigade
'Robicheaux' by James Lee Burke will have you lining up for more

Murder Ink: Joining the Burke brigade
Jeffrey Mannix - 02/01/2018

The big news in fiction publishing for 2018 is the Simon & Schuster January release of a new book by America’s best known and unarguably most skilled crime fiction writer, James Lee Burke. His new book, Robicheaux, is a long-awaited return to the atmospheric New Iberia/New Orleans domain of all things that lie then bite or sting to kill.

Burke’s Detective Dave Robicheaux, of the New Iberia Sheriff’s Department, and his Vietnam war sidekick, washed-out private investigator and ball buster Clete Purcel, have starred in 21 of Burke’s extraordinary oeuvre of 36 hardback fictions. Just when you feel Burke’s greatest book is the one you’ve just read, there comes another to eclipse it. His writing is thick and aromatic and full of completely formed characters, like Fat Tony Nine Ball; Didoni Giacano; Whitey (“I try to be kind to dumb Polacks, but I’m about to stuff you in the storm sewer”) Zeroski; Sheriff Helen Soileau; Nig Rosewater & Wee Willie Bimstine; Jimmy Nightingale; and Kevin Penny (“a man with a complexion like mold on a lamp shade.”) Then there’s the fecund, seething Bayou Teche, where nobody drowns before being eaten.

Burke’s plots pound away at you; he uses up the language. He’s a moralist, a Southerner, and I’d guess he’s a cop hater; and he’s a writer who doesn’t care what you think about run-on sentences of a hundred words or whether or not you like his point of view.

He’s a lone wolf who every other writer has been encouraged by and has plagiarized, if not in word than in spirit. James Lee Burke is a titan of fiction writing, someone the Denver Post, which has no skin in the publishing game, called “America’s best novelist.”

I started reading crime fiction many years ago with Burke, and Robicheaux is not so much better than any of Burke’s other remarkable books. But Burke is older now and more disappointed in people, and this new book bubbles right to the top with sentences like: “The South has changed in many ways, but beyond the sophistry and hush-puppy platitudes is a core group that is as malignant and hot and sweaty as a torchlit mob flinging a rope over a tree limb;” or, “He wore his irritability like a flag.” Here’s what the flyleaf on the dustcover says: “What emerges is not only a propulsive and thrilling novel but a harrowing study of America: this nation’s abiding conflict between a sense of past
grandeur and a legacy of shame, its easy seduction by demagogues and wealth, and its predilection for violence and revenge.”

Detective Dave Robicheaux is a man tortured by alcohol and nightmares of Vietnam and being a homicide cop and hurting people and being hurt. And in this  episode, the aging avenger finds himself investigating the killing of a man he’s convinced got away with murdering Robicheaux’s wife, Molly, many years ago. And he’s not entirely sure it isn’t himself he’s investigating, after the one night in 22 years he went to a bar instead of his AA meeting and his finger-prints were lifted from the scene. If you are an inveterate crime fiction reader, you know about Burke and have read more than a few of his books, and I’m wasting my time telling you about a new Burke book that’s already on your list. If you’re new to this exciting genre of growing prominence, be warned that this is a high-risk book for developing a substance abuse problem without a known cure. When you’re done with Ro-bicheaux, you’ll want more Burke no matter how advanced your jones is, and you should go immediately to his post-Katrina story, The Tin Roof Blowdown. Phew!

All of Burke’s books, at least the Robicheaux/Purcel New Iberia crime fictions, are keepers for rereading. Maria’s Bookshop will give a 15 percent discount on Robicheaux and all “Murder Ink” books, so skip lunch with whosis, buy the nicely made hard-back, then write a letter to the Durango Telegraph thanking them for providing you with a reason to stay home, offline and uncounted.

Top Shelf

Iron thrones, iron horses, Jewell and Denver
Iron thrones, iron horses, Jewell and Denver
By Chris Aaland
05/23/2019

Many of you have taken a few days to digest the final episode of “Game of Thrones.” I certainly have.

Old-timey Americana, red leather pants and newgrass
Old-timey Americana, red leather pants and newgrass
By Chris Aaland
05/16/2019

I’ve been fortunate to be a DJ and music writer since the late 1980s, when I was a college DJ at KDUR right on through my current role as on-air host and development director at KSUT.

Junkies move on & musical Mt. Rushmore
Junkies move on & musical Mt. Rushmore
By Chris Aaland
05/09/2019

I spend quite a bit of time on Twitter. I must admit, most of it is to see what the Deplorables have to say about Mango Mussolini’s latest misadventures.

Goodbye to Greg, Pretty Lights spin-off & Derby Day
Goodbye to Greg, Pretty Lights spin-off & Derby Day
By Chris Aaland
05/02/2019

The guitar gently weeps in Durango, as local icon Greg Ryder died in a head-on collision last week. A regular performer at the Strater for decades, Ryder’s warm voice, friendly smile and  omnipresence in front of a microphone made him a favorite of thousands of fans and countless local musicians

Read All in Top Shelf

Day in the Life

Cyclists of the Iron Horse: A Field Guide
Cyclists of the Iron Horse: A Field Guide
By Stephen Eginoire
05/23/2019

It’s everyone’s favorite bike-frenzied weekend, the 48th annual Iron Horse Bicycle Classic!

Painted Desert
Painted Desert
By Stephen Eginoire

At an abandoned gas station on the Navajo Nation in Black Mesa, Ariz., the building may be empty but the walls are full of life.

First blush
First blush
By Stephen Eginoire
05/09/2019

The lower Animas Valley all the way to New Mexico is home to a diverse array of flora and fauna. 

Surf's Up!
Surf's Up!
By Stephen Eginoire
05/02/2019

As mid-elevation snow melts its way into the Animas River, how refreshing it is to see a few thousand CFS of turbid water making its journey south to New Mexico.

Read All in Day on the Life