Bluebird day

Bluebird day

The Bluebird is about to take flight. Billing itself as the world’s first “human-powered” ski area, Bluebird Backcountry plans to fire up the, uh, climbing skins Sat., Feb. 15.
The 1,500-acre backcountry ski area is located on Whitely Peak, a 10,115-foot mountain on the south side of Rabbit Ears Pass, between Kremmling and Steamboat. The brain child of backcountry ski bros Erik Lambert and Jeff Woodward, Bluebird will be situated on land leased from a local rancher.
According to Lambert, the ski area is meant to offer a break from the “mega-resort” for those who like to earn their turns or are just backcountry-curious. In addition to ski and splitboard rentals, along with all the fixins, the ski area will offer guides, lessons and safety instruction, all in a kinder, gentler environment than your standard pucker-inducing avi chute.
“If we can provide better access and better education than what's currently out there, that's great for backcountry skiing and the growth of the sport,” Lambert told Colorado Public Radio. 
The ski area is laid out over 2,000 acres and touts open meadows, old-growth aspen glades and a “remarkable summit.” Although it will offer  trappings of traditional ski resorts, like  a warming hut, avalanche-evaluated terrain and ski patrol, Bluebird will offer amenities not found at your typical resort, including designated skin tracks, backcountry clinics, a beacon training park and, reportedly, lots of bacon.
During its trial season, Bluebird plans to be open for 15 days between Feb. 15 – March 15. About 300 acres will be open to free-range skiing with the rest reserved for guided excursions. A day pass will cost $50 and passes will be capped at 300 a day to help mitigate skintrack rage or “dude, that’s my line” skerfluffles. 
For more on Bluebird, go to www.bluebird backcountry.com.
 

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