Significant shrinkage

Significant shrinkage

No, you’re not imagining things. This week’s Telegraph is a few inches shorter than normal. But we swear it has nothing to do with shrinkflation or a desperate attempt to cut corners.

Rather, it has to do with the never-ending saga of print media in a digital age. See, while yours truly is healthy as a horse, or at least scrappy as a raccoon, it’s no secret that print newspapers have been struggling in recent years. And the big dogs of the print world are no different. Gannett, which owns the Farmington Daily Times where we have been printed for the last several years, has decided to shut down its printing press in Farmington amid declining …uh, well we don’t really know because no one told us. 

But enough of the economics lesson – back to the shrinkage (we prefer “petite”). With the Farmington press closed, that leaves our printing options few and far between. So, starting this week, the Telegraph, along with a handful of other regional papers, is being printed in the Arizona Republic’s press in Phoenix (also part of the Gannett chain). And a kind group of newspaper angels has offered to drive it up here every week for us. I guess you could say it’s kind of like a Christmas miracle.

We know, some are not going to like this new, more compact Tele, but we think it will just take some getting used to. Think of the upsides, like fewer murdered trees, and better aerodynamics and symmetry. Plus, with the move to the new press, we expect the quality to be much improved over the Farmington press, which we’re pretty sure belonged to Guttenberg himself. And for those who just steal the paper to burn – first, shame on you! – we expect our high-bright stock to burn even better.

So sit back and enjoy the new streamlined Tele, which is still jam-packed with all the same content you deserve and expect, just in a smaller package. And we all know size doesn’t matter anyway.

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The Pole

BYOPFD
04/11/2024

Grab the sunscreen, SUP, wetsuit and … life jacket. Lake Nighthorse opens for the season this Fri., April 12, with new rules requiring personal flotation devices and sound-signaling devices, like whistles, on paddle crafts.  

Tie on the feedbag
04/11/2024

If you’re famished from all your water sports this weekend, check out Durango Restaurant Week, April 12-21 (actually 10 days.)

Lord of the lunge
03/28/2024

It’s another one for the books. On Fri., March 25, New Yorker Austin Head set a Guinness World Record for lunging. As in those horrible exercises they make you do at the gym until your quads freeze up.

A trainer at Life Time Fitness in Brooklyn, Head broke the record by lunging 2,825 times in an hour through his DUMBO (“Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass”) neighborhood in Brooklyn. That’s 47 lunges a minute for those with a calculator, enough to smash the old record of 2,358 lunges. (Yes, apparently this lunging is a thing.)

Southern exposure
03/21/2024

While Durango endures the endless mud season, trails are drying out down south. Wait, what trails down south? Allow Neil Hannum, local cyclist and founder of Aztec Adventures, to introduce you.

According to Hannum, the sandy washes, oil roads and winding ridges of old New Mexico are prime mtb and gravel-riding terrain. So much so that Hannum started Aztec Adventures a few years back to share his love of the San Juan County, N.M., riding scene. 

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